Meals at Sēn Lín Hú

Our kitchen staff will tempt your taste buds with familiar fare like stir fry and rice, as well as foods you might not have tried before. Made from fresh ingredients by dedicated and skilled chefs, these authentic Chinese meals aren’t your typical camp food. Our food is not like what you find in the average Chinese restaurant, but is closer to the food actually eaten in China.

You can expect a lot of stir fried vegetables, various meat dishes plus Asian rice and noodles. Though it is different from what villagers generally eat at home, most villagers enjoy it. We simply ask you to come ready to try new and delicious foods.

We do provide snacks to villagers at various times during the day. All of our meals are served family style. When the food comes to the table, each diner takes the amount he or she would like, and passes it around until everyone has been served.

You’ll love exploring the language and traditions of China by tasting authentic Cantonese, Mandarin and Szechwan cuisine. If you finish your meal and are hungry for more, we encourage you to ask for seconds—using Chinese words, of course! Meal times are also a great time to practice your skills with chopsticks.

Each meal is accompanied by a meal presentation performed by a combination of staff and villagers. Every meal skit is unique and features a different aspect of Chinese culture and a new set of culinary vocabulary.

The cuisine prominently features fresh vegetables and rice. Chicken and pork are the two most-commonly served meats, though meat is not eaten as much in China as it is in America. Many participants report that the food is one of the best parts of the experience.

Special Dietary Requests

If you have food allergies, are vegetarian, or have other special dietary needs, just let us know. The chefs at will be happy to provide authentic and delicious meals that suit your needs, and your counselors will be there to help you.


Try a Recipe At Home

Chinese Cha Shao Pork
Savor the Asian flavor with this recipe for Chinese Char Siu Pork.

Serves 10

4 lbs - Boneless Pork Shoulder
½ cup - Sugar
½ cup - Soy Sauce
1/3 cup - Hoisin Sauce
¼ cup - Rice Wine
¼ tsp - White Pepper
1 tsp - Five-Spice Powder
1 Tbsp - Sesame Oil
2 Tbsp - Fresh Ginger, minced
1 count - Garlic Cloves, minced
¼ cup - Ketchup
1/3 cup - Honey

Cut the pork in half lengthwise with the grain. Turn each half cut side down and again slice lengthwise with the grain into four equal sized pieces. If there is a lot of fat, you will want to trim some, but make sure you leave some to help flavor the meat while it is cooking. In a large bowl, combine the sugar, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, rice wine, white pepper, five-spice, sesame oil, ginger and garlic. Measure out ½ cup of the sauce and set it aside. Add the pork to the remaining sauce and let it marinate for at least 30 minutes and up to four hours. Turn the meat occasionally to help it marinate.Once the pork is ready, preheat your oven to 375 ° F.

Combine your reserved marinade with the ketchup and honey in a small saucepan. Simmer it until it reduces and become a syrupy consistency that can be brushed onto the pork as a glaze. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and place a wire rack on the on the baking sheet. Remove the pork from the marinade and place it on the wire rack. Pour some water onto the baking sheet and place the pan in the center oven rack. Bake the pork for 10 minutes, and then brush it with the glaze. Reduce the oven to 300° F and return the pork to the oven. Bake the pork for another 30 minutes brushing it with the glaze every 10 minutes. It should turn a deep mahogany color. Remove it from the oven, let it sit for a few minutes and then slice it and serve.